Birding in Belize | Wildlife Photography

With over 590 bird species, Belize is a birdwatcher's paradise.  I've had the good fortune of appropriate birding accommodations in Belize, first in the Georgeville bush and now at Smith Farm right outside of San Ignacio Town, where local birds are found by simply wandering outside my cabana.  Every morning I'm out with my 200mm-400mm zoom trying to capturing shots in the rising sun or at dusk in the warm fading light.  Here are a few from my gallery with brief descriptions of each species:

 

KEEL-BILLED TOUCAN (Ramphastos Sulfuratus)

The Keel-billed Toucan's bill can reach lengths of nearly 20cm long and is around one third of the length of its body.  The Keel-billed Toucan has a diet that primarily consists of large quantities of different varieties of fruit and berries.  Large birds of prey and humans are the keel-billed toucan's main predators.

Keel-billed Toucan | Birds of Belize | Image By Indiana Architectural Travel Photographer Jason Humbracht

Keel-billed Toucan

Keel-billed Toucan | Birds of Belize | Image By Indiana Architectural Travel Photographer Jason Humbracht

Toucan Couple

 

WOODPECKERS 

The Lineated Woodpecker (Dryocopus pileatus) is 31.5 to 36 cm long and resembles the closely related pileated woodpecker.

Linefeed Woodpecker | Birds of Belize | Image By Indiana Architectural Travel Photographer Jason Humbracht

Lineated Woodpecker

The Yucat√°n woodpecker (Melanerpes pygmaeus) is a species of bird in the Picidae family.  It is sometime referred to as the red-vented woodpecker.

Yucatan Woodpecker | Birds of Belize | Image By Indiana Architectural Travel Photographer Jason Humbracht

Yucatan Woodpecker

 

RED-LORED PARROT (Amazona autumnalis)

The Red-lored Parrot is endemic to the tropical regions of the Americas, from eastern Mexico south to Ecuador.  It is absent from the Pacific side of Central America north of Costa Rica.  Their natural diet consists of a variety of fruits, nuts and seeds.

Red-Pored Parrot | Birds of Belize | Image By Indiana Architectural Travel Photographer Jason Humbracht

Red-lored Parrot

Red-Pored Parrot | Birds of Belize | Image By Indiana Architectural Travel Photographer Jason Humbracht

Red-lored Parrots

 

BLUE-CROWNED MOTMOT (Momotus momota)

Often sitting still in their dense forest habitat, the Blue-crowned Motmot can be difficult to see, despite their size. They eat small prey such as insects and lizards, and will also regularly take fruit.

Blue-crowned Motmot | Birds of Belize | Image By Indiana Architectural Travel Photographer Jason Humbracht

Blue-crowned Motmot

Blue-crowned Motmot | Birds of Belize | Image By Indiana Architectural Travel Photographer Jason Humbracht

Blue-crowned Motmot

 

GREAT-TAILED GRACKLE (Quiscalus mexicanus)

The Great-tailed Grackle, or blackbird, forages mostly on the ground, or by wading in very shallow water. Also forages in trees and shrubs, especially searching for nests to rob. Generally feeds in flocks.

Great-tailed Grackle | Birds of Belize | Image By Indiana Architectural Travel Photographer Jason Humbracht

Great-tailed Grackle

Great-tailed Grackle | Birds of Belize | Image By Indiana Architectural Travel Photographer Jason Humbracht

Great-tailed Grackle

 

GREAT KISKADEE (Pitangus sulphuratus)

The Great Kiskadee, or Flycatcher can be seen all  over Belize, and are usually heard before being seen.  While other birds are absent, kiskadees are active during the heat of the day looking for a meal

Great Kiskadee | Birds of Belize | Image By Indiana Architectural Travel Photographer Jason Humbracht

Great Kiskadee

Great Kiskadee | Birds of Belize | Image By Indiana Architectural Travel Photographer Jason Humbracht

Great Kiskadee

Related Images:

This entry was posted in Travel Photography and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , .

    Subscribe to Blog via Email

    Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

    Join 961 other subscribers

Post a Comment

Your email is never published nor shared. Required fields are marked *

*
*