Top 10 Travel Images Mexico 2015

The somewhat border town of Chetumal was our last stop in Mexico before entering into Belize, and the first stop upon exit.  On the drive to Belize we stayed there two nights, to kind of catch our bearings before crossing the border.  When we drove back to The States, we also stayed two nights because of the awesome hotel we found on the way down.

Lighthouse | Chetumal Mexico | photo taken by Indiana Architectural Photographer Jason Humbracht in 2015

Lighthouse in Chetumal, Mexico (shot @ 35mm | f/13 | 1/25sec | ISO 200 w/ edits in Lightroom and Topaz Adjust)

San Miguel de Allende, with its narrow cobblestone streets, panoramic views, and fine architectural details, is one of the prettiest towns I visited in Mexico.  The city's rich history dates back to 1542 when it played an important role as a hub in the silver trade.

Architecture of San Miguel de Allende Mexico | Image By Indiana Architectural Photographer Jason Humbracht

Architecture of San Miguel de Allende (shot @ 25mm | f/9 | -0.67 ev | 1/15sec | ISO 100)

San Miguel de Allende is known for its well-preserved Colonial and Spanish architecture.  The tallest building in the city, with a façade of pink limestone, is the Parroquia de San Miguel Archangel.  The gothic façade for this local parish church was inspired by Gaudi's Sagrada Familia in Barcelona. 

Spanish Architecture | San Miguel de Allende, Mexico | Image By Indiana Architectural Photographer Jason Humbracht

San Miguel de Allende, Parroquia de San Miguel Archangel in background (shot @ 50mm | f/8 | -0.67 ev | 1/200sec | ISO 100)

According to legend, its architect, Zeferino Gutierrez used a picture postcard for inspiration. (source)

San Miguel de Allende, Mexico at Night | Night Photography | Image By Indiana Architectural Photographer Jason Humbracht

San Miguel de Allende at Night (shot @ 38mm | f/18 | -0.67 ev | 20sec | ISO 200)

Cholula was second only to the Aztec capital Tenochtitlan (modern Mexico City), possibly with a population of up to 100,000.  The great city stood at the foot of what appears to be an earthen hill that is, in fact, the largest pyramid ever built, covering over 46 acres and spanning an incredible 405 meters on each side!  In addition to this great construction dedicated to Quetzalcoatl, the city had a reported 365 temples Quetzalcoatl,thecity had a reported 365 temples. 

Great Pyramid of Cholula | Cholula, Mexico | Image By Indiana Architectural Photographer Jason Humbracht

The Great Pyramid of Cholula

After taking the city during the Spanish Conquest, Hernan Cortes vowed that it would be rebuilt with a Christian church to replace each of the old pagan temples; less than 50 new churches were actually built, but the Spanish colonial churches are unusually numerous for a city of its size. (source)

Iglesia de Nuestra Señora de los Remedios Cholula Mexico photo taken by Indiana Architectural Photographer Jason Humbracht in 2015

Iglesia de Nuestra Señora de los Remedios (shot @ 13mm | f/8 | 1/160sec | ISO 100)

The city of San Luis Potosi owes its early importance to the discovery of a large silver and gold deposit in 1592. Though its mines never rivaled those of Guanajuato or Zacatecas, the city became an important administrative and commercial outpost.

San Luis Potosi Mexico | Spanish Architecture | photo taken by Indiana Architectural Photographer Jason Humbracht in 2015

San Luis Potosi, Mexico (shot @ 32mm | f/8 | 1/60sec | ISO 100)

In the 17th century it assumed the role of Mexico’s most important northern city, whose domain once stretched from Louisiana to New Mexico.

Street Photography | San Luis Potosi Mexico | Street Vendor | Image taken by Indiana Commercial Real Estate Photographer Jason Humbracht in 2015

Street Vendor in San Luis Potosi, Mexico (shot @ 92mm | f/8 | 1/125sec | ISO 100)

It is a metropolis that combines its mining past with the magical touch of beautiful buildings from Mexico's colonial past. In 2010, the historic center of the city was listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site. (source)

Architecture of San Luis Potosi Mexico photo taken by Indiana Architectural Photographer Jason Humbracht in 2015

San Luis Potosi, Mexico (shot @ 78mm | f/8 | 1/640sec | ISO 400)

For more on travel photography, go to my post Travel Photography Tips and Planning.

Architecture of San Luis Potosi, Mexico photo taken by Indiana Commercial Real Estate Photographer Jason Humbracht in 2015

Architecture of San Luis Potosi, Mexico (taken @ 18mm | f/8 | 1/13sec | ISO 100)

 

 

 

 

"Only those who dare to fail greatly can ever achieve greatly."

-Robert Kennedy

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